24/7 Support Number +91-9137-44-1392

Cancers of the Eye

Eye Cancer (Cancers of the Eye)

Eye Cancer (Cancers of the Eye )

Eye cancer, also known as ocular cancer or intraocular cancer, is a rare type of cancer that develops in the tissues of the eye. It can occur in different parts of the eye and melanoma is the most common type of eye cancer.

Where Eye Cancer starts 

Eye cancer that occurs in different areas of the eye included are –

  • The eyelid
  • The conjunctiva (the thin, transparent layer that covers the white part of the eye)
  • The iris (the colored part of the eye)
  • The ciliary body (the part of the eye that helps control the shape of the lens)
  • The retina (the light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye)

Types of Eye Cancer

There are several types of eye cancer, which can affect different parts of the eye. Some of the most common types include –

  1. Melanoma – This is the most common type of eye cancer in adults, and it affects the uvea, which is the middle layer of the eye.
  2. Retinoblastoma – This is a rare form of eye cancer that typically affects young children. It develops in the retina, which is the part of the eye that senses light.

Eye Cancer

3. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) – This type of eye cancer affects the conjunctiva, which is the thin, transparent layer that covers the white part of the eye.

4. Lymphoma – This is a rare type of eye cancer that can affect the orbit, which is the bony socket that holds the eye.

5. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) – This is a slow-growing type of eye cancer that affects the skin around the eye.

6. Rhabdomyosarcoma It starts in the soft tissue muscle around the eye. It is mostly diagnosed in babies and young children. 

Eye cancer is rare, and most eye problems are not cancerous. If you have concerns about your eye health, it’s always best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Symptoms

Eye cancer does not show symptoms in the early stages or until it interferes with the eye vision of a person. Experiencing relative symptoms does not indicate that you’ve had eye cancer. Sometimes, it can be a benign eye condition that can be cured in a few days. 

The symptoms of eye cancer can vary depending on the type and location of the cancer. However, some common symptoms may include –

  1. Vision changes – Blurred or distorted vision, or a sudden loss of vision in one or both eyes can be a sign of eye cancer.
  2. Eye pain – Persistent pain in the eye or around the eye can be a symptom of eye cancer.
  3. Redness or swelling – Redness or swelling of the eye, eyelid, or surrounding area can be a sign of eye cancer.
  4. Bulging or protruding eye – If one eye appears to be bulging or protruding, it may be a sign of eye cancer.
  5. Dark spots on the iris – If you notice a dark spot on your iris (the colored part of your eye), it could be a sign of eye cancer.
  6. Change in pupil size – If one pupil appears larger than the other, it could be a sign of eye cancer.

If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to see a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis. However, you need to keep in mind that many of these symptoms can also be caused by other medical conditions, so it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis.

Causes and Risk Factors

There are several risk factors that may increase the risk of developing eye cancer such as –

  • Age Mostly affecting people at the age of 50 or above.
  • Skin color White and pale skin people have a higher chance of getting eye cancer. 
  • Light-colored eyes – People with light-colored eyes (blue, green, or gray) are at a higher risk of developing eye cancer than those with dark-colored eyes.
  • UV exposure – Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds can increase the risk of eye cancer.
  • Family history – People with a family history of eye cancer are at higher risk of developing the condition.
  • Certain genetic disorders – Certain genetic disorders, such as neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), can increase the risk of eye cancer.
  • Weakened immune system – People with a weakened immune system, such as those with HIV/AIDS or those who have had an organ transplant, are at higher risk of developing eye cancer.
  • Occupational exposure – People who work with chemicals or in certain industries, such as welding, may be at higher risk of developing eye cancer.

Having one or more of these risk factors does not necessarily mean that a person will develop eye cancer. However, it’s a good idea to take precautions, such as wearing protective eyewear and avoiding excessive sun exposure, to reduce the risk of developing eye cancer.

Diagnosis and Tests

Diagnosing eye cancer usually involves a comprehensive eye exam and a number of specialized tests. Here are some of the most common diagnostic tests used to identify eye cancer:

  1. Dilated eye exam – During a dilated eye exam, the eye doctor will use eye drops to widen your pupils and examine the inside of your eye, including the retina, optic nerve, and blood vessels.
  2. Slit-lamp exam – This exam uses a special microscope with a bright light to examine the front of the eye, including the cornea, iris, and lens.
  3. Ultrasound – An ultrasound can be used to produce images of the inside of the eye and help the doctor identify any abnormal growth.
  4. Fluorescein angiography -This test uses a special dye and a camera to take pictures of the blood vessels in the eye, which can help the doctor identify any abnormal blood vessels or tumors.
  5. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) -This test uses light waves to produce detailed images of the retina and can help the doctor identify any abnormalities.
  6. Biopsy In some cases, the doctor may need to perform a biopsy, which involves removing a small sample of tissue from the eye for further testing. There are a range of treatments performed after your healthcare provider determines your condition from –
  • Fine-needle aspiration biopsy – It removes a sample of fluid from the eye to test cancer cells
  • Incisional biopsy – It removes part of the tumor and tests for cancer cells
  • Excisional biopsy – It removes the entire tumor and tests for cancer cells.

If eye cancer is suspected, the doctor may refer you to an eye specialist or an oncologist for further evaluation and treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment can improve the chances of a successful outcome, so it’s important to see a doctor promptly if you experience any symptoms or have concerns about your eye health.

Staging

The staging of eye cancer depends on the type and location of the cancer. Here are the general stages of some common types of eye cancer – 

1. Uveal melanoma

Stage 0 – The cancer is confined to the top layer of the uvea.

Stage I – The cancer is in the middle layer of the uvea, but is less than 2.5 mm thick.

Stage II – The cancer has spread to the middle layer of the uvea and is between 2.5 and 10 mm thick.

Stage III – The cancer has spread to the middle layer of the uvea and is greater than 10 mm thick.

Stage IV – The cancer has spread beyond the eye to other parts of the body.

2. Retinoblastoma

  • Intraocular retinoblastoma – The cancer is confined to the eye.
  • Extraocular retinoblastoma – The cancer has spread beyond the eye to other parts of the body.

3. Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma

  • Stage 0 – The cancer is confined to the conjunctiva.
  • Stage I – The cancer has spread beyond the conjunctiva to the cornea or sclera.
  • Stage II – The cancer has spread to the eyelid or adjacent tissue.
  • Stage III -The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes or other parts of the body.

The staging of eye cancer can be complex, and the above information is only a general guideline. The doctor will use a variety of tests and imaging studies to determine the extent of cancer and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Treatments

The treatment options for eye cancer depend on the type, location, and extent of the cancer. Here are some of the treatments that may be used –

  1. Surgery – Surgery is the most common treatment for eye cancer. The goal of surgery is to remove the tumor from the eye. Depending on the size and location of the tumor, the entire eye may need to be removed (enucleation). In some cases, a portion of the eye may be removed (partial or segmental resection).
  2. Radiation therapy – Radiation therapy involves using high-energy X-rays to kill cancer cells. It may be used alone or in combination with surgery. Radiation therapy can be given externally or internally (brachytherapy).
  3. Chemotherapy – Chemotherapy involves using drugs to kill cancer cells. It is not commonly used for eye cancer, but it may be used in combination with radiation therapy for some types of eye cancer.
  4. Targeted therapy – Targeted therapy involves using drugs that target specific molecules or proteins that are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. It is not commonly used for eye cancer, but it may be used in certain cases.
  5. Immunotherapy – Immunotherapy involves using drugs that stimulate the immune system to attack cancer cells. It is not commonly used for eye cancer, but it may be used in certain cases.

The treatment plan for eye cancer will depend on the specific type and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient’s overall health and preferences. It is important to discuss all treatment options with a healthcare professional.

Outlook

The outlook for eye cancer depends on several factors, including the type of cancer, its location and size, and how far it has spread. The overall prognosis for eye cancer can be difficult to predict because there are many different types of eye cancer with varying degrees of aggressiveness.

In general, the earlier eye cancer is detected and treated, the better the survival rate. Regular eye exams can help detect eye cancer early, and prompt treatment can help prevent cancer from spreading to other organs. It is best to consult your healthcare professional to acquire the necessary information about the outlook for your specific type of eye cancer based on its stage, location, and other factors.

We're not just a cancer treatment navigator, we're a community for cancer patients and caregivers because Community is Stronger than Cancer.

© 2024 Uhapo Health Services (P) Ltd.

× How may I help you?